My Awesome Announcement

I hate tooting my own horn but this is one of the proudest moments in my still short social media law career.  Please forgive the somewhat staged presentation but those who know me know that if I’m going to tell a story I need to make it interesting.

I was at the University of Texas Co-op’s law school location last week browsing the Nutshell books.  (Go with me, people.)  For those of you not in the legal profession, congrats on that by the way, know that the Nutshell series is put out by West Academic (one of the biggest names, if not the biggest name, in the legal publishing world) and is a fantastic resource for an overview of legal issues in a particular topic.  They aren’t casebooks–larger books with often edited cases to look at judicial rulings on certain areas.  Nutshells get right to the point and provide essential information on the overall legal topic.  I used more than one when I was in law school and as a practicing attorney.

But I noticed something was missing from the Nutshell section.  Can you spot it?

Can you spot what's missing?

Can you spot what’s missing?

That’s right, there’s no Social Media Law in a Nutshell.

Let’s fix that, shall we?

I’m proud to announce that I will be writing Social Media Law in a Nutshell for West Academic.  My co-author, Thaddeus Hoffmeister, is a professor of law at the University of Dayton School of Law and has previously published a book on social media in the courtroom.  His knowledge of social media litigation, evidence uses, and applicability in criminal cases will combine with my information on the marketing, content, employment and other social media uses to make this a comprehensive review of social media across all legal channels.

Doing this as a Nutshell book feels perfect right now.  There isn’t a wealth of case law on social media issues, but there are certainly cases out there.  In some areas the most fascinating legal issues are taking place outside of a courtroom so a Nutshell allows us to cover those topics in ways a casebook couldn’t.  Plus, when the movie rights get picked up we all agree that Hugh Jackman can play me.  He’s just a more talented and better looking version of me who can also sing and dance and has a better accent.  The resemblance is uncanny.

I’m not sure when the book will be released but it certainly won’t be until 2015 at the earliest.  Rest assured I’ll let you all know as the process unfolds.

Yesterday I published the 100th blog post here on SoMeLaw Thoughts.  When I look back at how much has changed in social media since I started writing about it, not just my own professional involvement, it’s staggering.  I feel incredibly lucky to take this journey and contribute to the field as well as participate in a line of books that I personally value.  To join the ranks of the Nutshell books blows my mind.

Thanks to all of my readers and friends on social media who have pushed/pulled/heckled me along the way.  An even bigger thanks to my family for putting up with my little side projects.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got some writing to do.

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13 Quick Thoughts About The iPhone 6 Plus

You wouldn't like the iPhone 6 Plus when it gets angry.

You wouldn’t like the iPhone 6 Plus when it gets angry.

Because social media and mobile technology are so well connected and because I didn’t want to post a long thing on Facebook, here are some quick thoughts from my own use of my new iPhone 6 Plus.  Most of these are answers to questions I’ve been asked.  If you have some questions, fire away.

  1. Yes, it’s big.  When you put it next to an older model iPhone it seems gigantic. Shockingly, once you start using it away from your old phone it does seem a bit bigger but not much.  I believe a similar technique will be used to shrink Paul Rudd in the Ant-Man movie.
  2. Yes, it fits in my pocket.  Both my jeans pocket (but I don’t wear skinny jeans because a-I’m not skinny and b-ew) and my shirt pocket.  When it sits in my shirt pocket the top bit including the camera does stick out so it might concern people that I’m filming them as I walk by.  Which I’m not.  Probably.
  3. I have no idea if it fits in a suit jacket pocket.  What’s a suit jacket?  I live in Austin and I’m in-house counsel.  That means I’m forbidden by two sets of laws to wear a suit.  Same with this sports coat people mention.
  4. Yes, I can use it one handed.  And that’s without doing the double tap to bring the top stuff down to the bottom, although that helps too.  I don’t know if it’s because I have large hands (I never thought I did) or if it’s because I grew up playing arcade games in the 80s (which required you to dislocate three fingers to play Defender for more than 3 levels–and don’t get me started on my finger speed thanks to Track & Field).  Either way, I can use it just fine with one hand.  A bit slower than the iPhone 5 but that could be the size or just getting used to it.
  5. Set up was super easy.  Maybe it’s because I’m used to switching Apple phones, but the old back-up with encryption (to keep your passwords) and restore from backup worked flawlessly.  I did have a slight hiccup getting the phone to active (you have to call an 866 number for AT&T) and then there was a weird iMessage bug (solved by turning iMessage off and back on, IT Crowd for the win!).
  6. It’s actually faster to use with two hands.  I didn’t think about this but maybe it does show my hands are that big.  I was never able to use my previous iPhones with two hands.  My hands just got in the way–at least to make it any faster than using it one handed.  But now there is plenty of room to navigate so I can move faster with two hands typing.  That’s pretty neat.
  7. The predictive keyboard is very cool.  Having a few options available is nice and it seems to make that damn autocorrect less intrusive.  I hope this doesn’t mean Damn You Autocorrect is going away because those are the best.  My favorite feature–if someone sends you a message with two options (e.g., “This or that?”) then without typing a character the predictive keyboard will give you the choice of “This” or “That.”  Nice touch.
  8. Jitterbug mode sucks, will hopefully improve over time.  You know Jitterbug, the smart phone for “aging Americans?”   Using an iPhone app that hasn’t been redesigned for the 6 Plus’ screen feels a bit like using an app on Jitterbug.  Suddenly everything is blown up to silly levels as iOS scales the apps to fill the space rather than give a big black border like the first iPads did.  My Good For Enterprise app still shows 3.5 emails on the Inbox view only now each one is massive.  Compare that to the native Mail app that shows 6.5 in highly legible type.  I know it’s just a matter of time before the main apps I use update (Good, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) but that can’t come fast enough.
  9. The battery rocks.  This may be a combination of leaving autobrightness on (which works much better than it did with my 5–I constantly had it on brightest mode for most of the day) but I noticed it yesterday when I cranked the brightness as well (before realizing I didn’t need to).  Right now my battery is sitting at 75%.  I’ve had typical usage of it today, perhaps a bit less than others.  But on most days my iPhone 5 would be at 20%-30% by the end of lunch.  75% is amazing.
  10. I still haven’t played with the camera.  I look forward to having fun with slow motion and burst photos and all that, but I’m not a good photographer and I take pictures when needed.  Like if there’s a funny sign.
  11. Native HD screen rocks!  The biggest draw for the Plus over the basic 6 was, for me, the native HD screen.  This screen has all the pixels of a 1080p video stream.  Every other phone has to squeeze it down a bit.  Every other iPad with more pixels is just stretching the image out.  This is fantastic for someone like me who only uses my iPad to watch movies and read comics.  Now I don’t need that for movies (and I’m hoping Comixology gives us full page view on the 6 Plus soon).  I watched some Netflix on it last night and that was awesome.  Holding a 5.5″ screen a foot away from my eyes seems larger than my living room TV which is 57″ but ten feet away.
  12. I’m hopeful this is my iPad replacement.  I don’t like travelling with two devices or having some games/apps on my iPad while my essential stuff is on my iPhone.  My goal is for this device to replace my old phone (check) and my iPad (let’s see, but so far so good).
  13. There is no item 13.  But congrats on making it to the end.

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Filed under Apple, Email, Facebook, Technology, Twitter

Eight Social Media Rules For Kids

“Mommy? I need more Candy Crush lives!”

Coming up with rules for kids on social media is hard.  First, coming up with any set of rules for kids is hard as any parent can attest.  But when you’re talking about a complicated subject like social media it can be even trickier.  There are very real risks of kids not realizing what’s appropriate or not on social media or not realizing who can see their content.  There are also scary but not true stories about predators seeking kids on social media or other online boogeymen that even if we rationally don’t believe we also don’t want to be the one parent whose child actually faced the monster.

Even though I work in the social media space I hadn’t given the topic of social media rules for kids much thought until a co-worker (hat tip to Gretchen) asked me about it this week.  My boys are too young for any social media platforms and still young enough that their friends aren’t pressuring them to join.  But I know that will change and it will change faster than I want it too.  And while it may be a simple rule to say “No social media until you’re [AGE]!” I also know that social media is as much a part of young culture as it is adult culture.  Banning something isn’t as effective as teaching them the right way to do it.

But for young kids first experiencing social media it’s a huge topic to cover.  In some ways I compare it to driving a car–it’s a tool that everyone uses and it’s important to learn how to use it properly because bad things can happen if you mess around.  But in other ways this is a bad comparison–when a teenager learns to drive they’ve been sitting in a car as a passenger for many, many years.  Children first going online typically haven’t been a backseat passenger to their parents’ online activities so we have to teach them the rules of a road they’ve never been on.

This topic prompted me to post some initial rules for kids on social media which I invited comments on and then revised.  I share them here because it was a good conversation but let me make a few important call-outs.

  • As with any set of rules for kids, these are completely customizable for your family and your children.  I am not saying this is the right way to do it, this is just one way to start thinking about it.
  • The rules are written a bit strongly but that’s because social media is similar to a car that weighs several tons–use it correctly and you’re good.  One bad accident can have serious consequences.  I’m not trying to scare people, I’ve just worked long enough in the space to know better.  I imagine ambulance drivers and emergency room workers have similar conversations with their kids about driving motorcycles.
  • These are basic rules that I want to apply to all platforms but also to trigger a series of conversations about how to use social media.  That’s the basis of rule five. Nobody should think you can give these rules to a child and then they know what to do–this is the foundation for you to teach them about posting appropriate content, providing appropriate responses, and engaging with people they do or do not know in real life.  This is the start of the conversation, not the end or the totality.

That said, here are the Eight Rules.  If you have additions, please leave me a comment below.

  1. This is not your account, this is my account with your name on it.
  2. I will set the password and you will not change it. If the platform requires you to change it then you will come to me and I will change it for you.
  3. I will be monitoring your account. Don’t post or say anything that you don’t want me to see because I will see it. If you’d like something more private I’m happy to buy you a diary and a pen.
  4. When I say I will be monitoring your account I mean that I will be actively watching your account and so will many other people. All of these people, like me, have your best interest in mind when we stop you from doing unwise things.
  5. I understand you’ll be learning how to use social media and that the learning process is a journey so I will be patient and explain the things you should and shouldn’t do. You, in turn, need to understand that there are risks and concerns you can’t comprehend right now so while some of my advice may seem odd you will still need to follow it.
  6. If you ever have a question about posting something, ask me first. Social media is about conversations but it is also very different from the actual conversations you’ve had with family and friends. It takes time to learn but it’s better to ask first than regret later.
  7. I will warn you once before I remove your access to the account. Unless you do something really awful in which case you won’t get a warning. Trying to circumvent these rules (making another account, deleting accounts, etc.) is automatically awful.
  8. If you think these rules are strict just wait until we talk about driving when you’re 16.

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Filed under Cyberbullying, Kids, Privacy, Social Content, Social Media Risks, Social Platforms

Iceholes: How The ALSA May Win The Battle But Lose The War

You know what we do to bad ice on a pedestal?

The biggest surprise hit of the summer is not Guardians of the Galaxy but rather the megaviral smash Ice Bucket Challenge benefiting the ALS Association. Rather than be thankful for this windfall the ALSA has recently decided that they should own this challenge and prevent any other cause or organization from using it. What do you think they are, a charity?

Oh yeah, they are.  Then maybe they should start acting like it and not a bunch of selfish iceholes.

First, some background. The ALSA did not create the ice bucket challenge. The gimmick has been around for a long time. In fact, when this latest round started over the summer it began as a challenge to dump a bucket of ice water on your head or donate $100 to a charity of your choice.  It was only when the challenge first passed to professional golfer Chris Kennedy that the donation was flagged for the ALSA and the individuals he tagged kept the charity when they made their videos.  Later, there was a significant wave of ice bucket activity in Boston due to native ALS sufferer Pete Frates and concerted actions by the Red Sox organization.  Facebook’s data team’s analysis shows that Boston does appear to be the epicenter of the challenge going truly viral.

Nobody is exactly sure why the challenge has reached its current level of popularity, but that’s true for most viral hits in the social media age.  Sure, the videos are funny. And having one person tag several others to participate makes for an exponential reach. And having the challenge somehow associated with charity so we all think we can have fun while helping out a worthy cause makes it seem nice too. There are even a scattering of super serious videos in the mix depicting a bit of what the disease means to its victims and their families. We can identify all the elements but we still don’t know what made this challenge go viral like it did.  Heck, even I did one.  Although I’m not linking it after the reasons behind this post.

That doesn’t really matter though. It doesn’t matter that we can’t explain why it went viral; it went viral. It doesn’t matter that perhaps the amount of money we give to charities is out of proportion to the impact of the disease as IFLScience linked in a Vox article infographic; there is no doubt this is a horrific disease and increased attention to it is a good thing. It doesn’t matter that ALSA only spends a small percentage of its budget on research; it performs several other valuable services and all charities have to spend a lot of money to ultimately make more money in the end.

Here’s what does matter: the ALSA was given the greatest gift of their life in terms of this ice bucket challenge.  Donations are through the roof.  Yesterday they reported making over $94.3 million in donations in just the last month.  Last year, in the same time period, they received around $2.7 million.  Rather than just say thanks or give the tearful Sally Field “You like me, you really like me!” Oscar acceptance speech they decided to go another direction. They decided to take that warm fuzzy feeling we’ve had from watching or making these videos and donating to a worthy cause and pour a giant bucket of ice water on our flames of altruism.

As first reported on the Erik M Pelton & Associates blog, the ALSA filed an application with the US Patent and Trademark Office to be granted a trademark for the term ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE as used for any charitable fundraising.  They also filed an application for ALS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE but it’s the main application that should make people furious.  Heck, it made me enough to write a blog post on a Thursday night and I never do that.

Filing a trademark for the term “Ice Bucket Challenge” would allow them to prevent any other charity from promoting a campaign that the ALSA had fall into their lap.  The ALSA did not create this concept.  They did not market this campaign until it already went viral.  They have no responsibility whatsoever for this going viral.  If the ice bucket challenge had found a connection to the American Heart Association or the American Cancer Society then it could have gone just as viral.

What on earth could make the ALSA think they should have any right whatsoever to prevent someone else from using this challenge?

I can’t think of a good reason.  I can think of reasons, mind you.  They just aren’t good.  Fortune was able to get a statement from ALSA spokesperson Carrie Munk:

The ALS Association took steps to trademark Ice Bucket Challenge after securing the blessings of the families who initiated the challenge this summer. We did this as a good faith effort after hearing that for-profit businesses were creating confusion by marketing ALS products in order to capitalize on this grassroots charitable effort.

Sorry, ALSA, but that excuse doesn’t hold water.

First, obtaining the blessings of the families who created this challenge is nonsense.  Even if you got permission from everyone who ever did an ice bucket challenge–SO WHAT?  This was a charity drive.  You think the first charity to earn a million dollars from a bake sale should get to stop all other bake sales?  Because that’s what filing a trademark on the challenge is an attempt to do–you’re trying to stop any other charity from using the term for fundraising.

Second, you heard some shady companies were making money off the Ice Bucket Challenge?  Wow, that must be weird.  To think there are these companies just sitting around making money off something they didn’t create.  JUST LIKE YOU.  Who cares if someone makes an Ice Bucket Challenge shirt and sells it?  If it says ALSA on it or has your logo you can already go after them without this new trademark application.

The ALSA’s actions are atrocious and reprehensible.  They may have raised a ton of money this summer but it could all backfire over a move like this.

But here, ALSA, I’m going to be nicer than you appear to be.  Here’s a way for you to cover your cold, soaked behinds and spin this in a favorable way.  What you should have done is post on your website the day you filed the application, saying that you are only doing so to protect all charities from shady profiteers but that all charities would be free to use the mark forever for no charge if you received the trademark.  The fact that you didn’t tell anyone about the application and only commented when it was called out on social media (by the way, you’ve heard about this social media thing and how a lot of people use it, right?) you can just blame on being so busy counting all your money.  It’s a bad excuse, but maybe it can save some face.

Because right now you look like a bunch of iceholes and I resent every penny I gave you.  Not for the good work you’ve done, which is a lot, or the families you’ve helped, which are numerous, but for being greedy instead of generous, selfish instead of, you know, charitable.

Update Aug 29: The ALSA has withdrawn their trademark application. Good.

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Filed under Celebrities, Crowdfunding, Facebook, Social Content, Social Tracking

Wish I Was Legal

It’s a movie.

I’m a social media law geek.  I have long accepted this fact and it shouldn’t be a revelation to you since you’re, you know, reading a blog about social media law.  So nobody should be surprised that when I attended a movie premiere for Wish I Was Here last week and everyone took out their smartphones to take pictures of Zach Braff and Donald Faison I, instead, took pictures of the disclosure form and privacy warning.  Because I’m geek like that.

I was a backer of Mr Braff’s Kickstarter campaign and paid to get two tickets to the Austin premiere and Q&A session.  I am not a superfan of Mr. Braff–I thought Garden State was okay and I only watched a season or two of Scrubs–but I do think he’s a talented actor and saw him perform in Twelfth Night at Shakespeare in the Park.  I was also intrigued by the Kickstarter project, being the first high publicity original movie to be funded after Veronica Mars.  I sent my money, read the updates, and watched the backlash roll in with curiousity.

There were four items of interest that struck me regarding social media law at the movie premiere.  I’m going to tell you three of them.  Just kidding, here’s all four.

photo 11. The release form

I’ve enclosed a picture of the consent and release form that all attendees were required to sign prior to entering the theater.  Much of it is standard for a movie screening where filming will take place if they may use the footage for behind the scenes featurettes.  But the item that jumped out to me is the item IN BOLD ALL CAPS.  Because, you know, that’s what bold all caps is supposed to do.

That text reads

I agree that to the extent I make any statements about the content including via social media or other public forums (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Blogs, etc.) that such statements (“Statements”)…IF THE STATEMENT IS MADE ON SOCIAL MEDIA OR ANOTHER PUBLIC ON-LINE FORUM, I WILL DISCLOSE NEXT TO MY STATEMENT(S) THE MATERIAL CONNECTION BETWEEN MYSELF AND FOCUS FEATURES (I.E. I SAW THE PICTURE FOR FREE AT AN ADVANCE SCREENING

This statement is for participants to comply with the FTC Endorsement Guidelines.  They’re even explicitly called out in the next sentence of the release but they aren’t IN BOLD ALL CAPS so you might have missed it.

That’s a great call-out for such a long release form.  It may be the only sentence you actually read if you’re handed this page and given a minute to sign before getting out of the hot Texas sun into the air conditioned theater.  Although I may quibble with some technicalities (I paid for the tickets via Kickstarter so it wasn’t free, and I paid Zach Braff’s group not Focus) I’m a professional quibbler so I’m willing to focus on the positive.  A good call-out for a venture they know will get mentioned on social media.

photo 22. The consent sign

This sign was posted inside the theater before you could get to the orchestra seating and visible from the stairs leading to the balcony.  While I understand the need for something like this, heck I’ve drafted a few in my career, I also think this sign goes a bit overboard.  First, the release was already in the signed form that everyone had to fill out before they got inside so this is duplicative at best–but as a lawyer I can appreciate having multiple points where consent was gained just in case a lawsuit comes up (especially after DVDs have been produced).

I take less issue with the repetition than I do with the scope–while the signed form seems more targeted in the consent, this poster goes a bit overboard.  Sure, it’s easier to print a sign with less language like YOU GIVE ME ALL THE RIGHTS! RAWR! it also goes beyond the scope of the event.  According to this sign, Focus Features can now use my photograph to publicize an entirely different movie or event and that doesn’t help anyone.

I don’t think Focus would use my photo to publicize a different movie, mostly because I thoroughly enjoyed Reign of Fire and therefore have horrible taste in movies, but also because this is more likely just a defensive consent.  If someone were to sue for being on the DVD then the company has a signed release form and this poster to use in their defense.

Still, even though I may be the only person who read this sign (and definitely the only one to take a picture of it), I have to wonder what would happen if someone took issue with the consent.  I paid for the tickets to the premiere–that’s what the Kickstarter event promised me.  There is some general language in the Kickstarter campaign that if a reward conflicts with laws they’ll work to give you a substitute, but it isn’t a conflict of law for me to attend without giving consent to filming.  Just a small thought–perhaps they had a special area reserved for non-consenting audience members or they figured the odds were so low of this being an issue it wasn’t worth developing a plan.  I just find that kind of thing interesting.

3. The backlash

During the Q&A session after the film, one man asked Mr. Braff if he experienced any backlash over the funding.  The response was along the lines of “Where have you been?  Did you contribute and then go off-line for a year?  Did you just land from the space station and thought, ‘Hey, I can still make the premiere!’”  It was funny and the audience’s reaction showed they were all aware of the backlash as well.

The answer was interesting as well.  Mr. Braff explained how his world is all about getting films financed and when something is your world you unrealistically expect that other people will know something about that world.  So when the backlash started rolling in about the Kickstarter project he suddenly realized that people didn’t really understand how films are financed and why Kickstarter could help him.  So that was a lesson learned, but ultimately something he wasn’t concerned about since his fans and other interested parties did back him and that mattered more.

Mr. Braff did express some concern over the backlash regarding Kickstarter itself–specifically that people attacked him for taking money away from other Kickstarter projects that could use the money more.  He said that Kickstarter was quiet at first but later spoke up saying that high publicity projects like this do draw attention to the platform and ultimately bring in new users who end up funding more projects–the net being more money shared with more projects.  I can’t find a link to Kickstarter’s statement but that makes sense and is also probably a lesson learned for future high publicity projects.

4. Reflecting on the social world

At the end of the Q&A session, Mr. Braff and Mr. Faison sang “Guy Love” as a special treat to the audience.  They said it had been a while since they performed it and don’t get a lot of opportunities to sing it together so everyone should record it.  And so they did.  This was my view of the song:

photo

Working in social media I often take for granted the world of information and connections we have at our fingertips.  But every once in a while it strikes home.  When I looked at the event before my eyes I wasn’t watching the stage, I was looking at all those phones.  Yes, in my head I realized everyone probably has one, but it takes events like these for that to sink in sometime.  Seeing everyone recording the event, having their own perspective and building their own memories and being able to share it with all of their friends as well.

That’s awesome.  That’s social media.

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Filed under Celebrities, Copyright, Crowdfunding, FTC Endorsement Guidelines, Social Investment, Social Platforms, Terms and Conditions

Here’s Why Killing Net Neutrality Makes You Pay Twice

This matters. A lot.

I’m not going to recap the wealth of discussion and debate over Net Neutrality.  You know how to use Google, so use that to find more information.  Or for the most basic of primers check out this great video from the New York Times on How Net Neutrality Works.  It explains the concept well and has some great points from David Carr (who, according to this video, has a head so huge I’m afraid it might snap his neck any second) about controlling content as well as access.

But even if the debate over Internet innovation doesn’t motivate you to take action then perhaps this will.  Killing Net Neutrality will make you pay more money not once but twice.  Here’s how.

First, for the large bandwidth services like Netflix and Hulu and Amazon Instant Video, paying for access will be an absolute must.  Take a look at Netflix’ blog post about why Net Neutrality is important, specifically the second chart which shows what happened when Netflix started paying Comcast for priority access:

Netflix was forced to do this because average Netflix access speed was decreasing to unacceptable levels for Comcast customers.  (This was not happening to customers on other carriers…isn’t that an odd coincidence?)  If they hadn’t paid then customers would be upset.

But where do you think this extra money is going to come from?  Netflix customers, that’s who.  It will either come from their customers in the form of increased monthly rates over time or it will come in the form of less content that Netflix now develops because part of that money is routed to paying ISP tolls.  Either way, this is the first time you’ll pay without Net Neutrality as all the major bandwidth services are forced to incur this expense.

The second way you’ll pay is in the form of reduced access to everyone who isn’t willing to pay.  Maybe the site isn’t large enough to pay the tolls but you really enjoy it–be prepared to have their access de-prioritized in exchange for all the major players.  Or maybe the site simply can’t afford the tolls even if lots of people use it.  Think Wikipedia.

This problem gets worse the more high-bandwidth content is forced to pay for tolls and get priority access.  Of the big three streaming services, you may subscribe to one or none of them–but that won’t stop their content from delaying everything else heading your way.

So you’ll have the privilege of paying a second time for no Net Neutrality.  Maybe you’ll pay to try and get more bandwidth to your house, a method which may not work if the major networks are still crammed with the high-bandwidth priority content.  Or maybe you’ll just pay with your time, waiting longer periods for content that used to be treated equally.  And yes, to paraphrase, time is a form of payment.

If you honestly don’t have an opinion on Net Neutrality, maybe that will connect with you.  Paying twice for a rule change is a pretty bad option compared to everyone participating equally in a single network and everyone having a vested interest in making the entire network run better.  The proposed rules by the FCC kill net neutrality–they hide behind this nomenclature of Open Internet but that is not a Neutral Internet.

All the major technology, content, and social media companies support Net Neutrality.  The big companies like Netflix and Facebook know that a neutral Internet let them become the giants they now are.  The smaller companies know that a neutral Internet is the only way they can compete against their larger competitors.  And technology innovators everywhere know that having equal access is the best way to develop new platforms and software.

Do you know who supports killing Net Neutrality?  The carriers.  That’s it.

If you feel compelled to take action, here’s a great article on how you can submit comments to the FCC while they are still considering their proposed rule changes.

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Social Media Law Final (You Know You’re Curious)

Because triumph.

While I enjoy many aspects of being a social media lawyer one of my absolute favorites is teaching a class I developed at the University of Texas School of Law.  This spring I taught the class for a second time to an even larger class and had many entertaining classes and conversations throughout the year.  We even had to deal with actual ice cancellations and fake ice cancellations and held one class virtually over Adobe Connect.  All in all, a fun semester.

Since my class covers a variety of legal subjects impacted by social media, the final also covers a number of different topics.  And just like last year when I posted the first law school exam I gave, below is an embed of this year’s final.  Now you can play along and imagine what you would respond if you had to take this final.  I omitted the first page which was just directions–just know it was open book and students had three hours to take the exam.  Each question was weighed equally.

Oh, and there’s a social media easter egg hidden in the final.  Let me know if you find it.

Update: Jason Ross found the easter egg first, so congrats to him!  Yes, I rickrolled my students, they just didn’t realize it.  Read the first letter of each line of the final.

 

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