Tag Archives: Charleston Law Review

My Keynote: Seven Stories of Social Media Legal Risk

This.

You always remember your first keynote.  So I’ve been told.  And so far, that’s true.  I’ve spoken at conferences, chaired conferences, led panels and participated on them.  I’ve taught one-off classes and an ongoing Law and Social Media class at the University of Texas School of Law.  But this past January was a big milestone for me as I was invited to deliver the keynote address at the Charleston Law Review’s annual symposium.  The year before, their keynote speaker was retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.  I figured she was an acceptable opening act for me.

It actually took me a while to decide what to speak about–there are so many great subjects within social media and the law (hence this blog).  So I cheated a bit and instead of picking one topic I picked seven.  Actually a bit more than seven but I organized these subjects around seven stories of social media legal risk.

The symposium was fantastic.  A great venue in the Charleston Music Hall (I’ve never spoken in a room with a balcony except my own living room and that’s mostly to tell my boys to come downstairs).  And a great schedule with four other panels dealing with social media and the law, but not marketing–typically the majority of social media law talk is about marketing.  It was refreshing to see a symposium with panels on employment issues, your digital afterlife (what happens to your accounts after you die), privacy, and legal ethics.  Fantastic speakers, materials, and very well organized.  Total package.

Charleston Law Review ended up posting the video of my keynote.  I’ve embedded the YouTube video of my keynote below in case you have 55 minutes or so to kill and want to fill it with some fun social media stories. And below that is an embed of my slides because I use slides a lot but you can’t see them in the video. So you’ll just have to click along yourself to see all the fun.

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